Learning to ride a motorcycle using Vulcan 900 - Kawasaki Vulcan Forum : Vulcan Forums
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post #1 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-14-2012, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Learning to ride a motorcycle using Vulcan 900

Hello All,

I learnt to ride a motorcycle back in India 16 years ago. I have considerable riding experience in that country. Recently I got a preowned Vulcan 2007 Classic LT and have been loving it.

Some of my friends are now interested in learning to ride a motorcycle. They have zero riding experience. But they know to drive a stick shift and are very good bicycle riders. I am of the opinion that Vulcan 900 is not a good motorcycle to learn to ride a motorcycle. But you never know!

Did any of you learn to ride a motorcycle straight out of a Vulcan 900?

Thanks and Regards,
Sharada
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post #2 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-14-2012, 04:03 PM
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The VN900 was my 1st bike. I feel like I couldn't have made a better decision. But I HIGHLY recommend, as everyone here will also recommend, is taking the MSF course. It is vital and essential in becoming comfortable and educated in riding a motorcycle. I really think that would be the 1st step in learning to ride a motorcycle.


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post #3 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-14-2012, 04:09 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you atineo1982 for the response.

Did you take the MSF course first before learning to ride the motorcycle or did you learn to ride using VN900 and eventually took the MSF course to know more about safety?

In any case, VN900 is a super heavy bike and I am glad that you could learn to ride using that beast! I salute you!
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post #4 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-14-2012, 04:41 PM
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You should take the course first, but you don't have to. I bought my first bike, rode it for a bit and then took the course. I've been ridding for 20 years now, and I can tell you the Basic and Advanced MSF courses are an excellent way to be a better rider, and to be safer in general.

After you get good, look around for a course similar to the Jerry "MotorMan" Palladino Ride like a Pro class: https://www.ridelikeapro.com/rider-classes.

This class is all about slow speed control and maneuvers, and I highly recommend it to anyone. I had the opportunity to take it, and it is a simplified version of the police motorcycle course. Very helpful, and if you pass it you will be light years ahead of most other riders.

Doc
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post #5 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-14-2012, 05:37 PM
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My first bike was (and still is) a VN900 Custom, but I "learned" on the 250cc provided at the MSF course I took ten days prior.

Now, taking into consideration I only spent the better part of 8 hours on the 250cc in class (that also being the only time I'd ever been on a bike period), my first "real" ride outside of the MSF parking lot was a 25 mile trip from the dealership to my home on my 900. This route took me on highways and side streets, in and out of construction zones and really was where I put everything I had learned into practical application.

MY true learning is and will continue to be on my 900 for the foreseeable future. Until (and unless) I upgrade, my 9 and I will grow and learn with each other.

Best of luck with yours and to your friends as well!

Ride safe and ride on!

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post #6 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-14-2012, 07:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharadaprasad View Post
Thank you atineo1982 for the response.

Did you take the MSF course first before learning to ride the motorcycle or did you learn to ride using VN900 and eventually took the MSF course to know more about safety?

In any case, VN900 is a super heavy bike and I am glad that you could learn to ride using that beast! I salute you!
I took the course 2 years prior to buying my motorcycle. I have yet to take the advanced course


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app

Blind men don't fear snakes in the grass...
_____________________________________________
2008 Vulcan 900 Custom

V & H Slash Cut Staggered
ISO Grips, Pegs, Stiletto End Caps
Irate Customs Radiator and Regulator Grill
Kuryakyn Bullet Tail Lights
Clear Tail Lense
Swing Arm Bag
Front Tool Bag
Clear Turn Signals
Cobra Headlight Visor
Avon 230/60 15 Roadrunner
LA Choppers Lowering Kit

More to come...
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post #7 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-14-2012, 11:47 PM
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Sounds like you have some riding experience, but your friends have not. They should take the MSF beginner course. It establishes a good set of riding habits from the beginning. While it is true that you don't have to take the course, it is to a beginner's benefit to do so, if you learn on you own, you won't be able tell if you are doing something wrong. A good instructor can point out mistakes and show you how to do it correctly. That way a beginner can get started out on the right foot.

Can the 900 be a good beginner's bike? That depends on the individual. Are they strong enough to handle the weight? I'll have to say that learning on a smaller-displacement, milder bike sure involves a lot less stress on a new rider, not having to deal with the weight of, say, a Vulcan 900. But if the person is up to it, the 900 can be a very good bike to learn on. The added benefit to it, is it makes a very nice bike for even an experienced rider. I've been riding for 40 years, and I really like my 900LT.

"Don't sweat the small stuff---it's all small stuff"

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post #8 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-15-2012, 05:31 AM
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It might be a bit heavy for a smaller learner and it's not very manouverable but the power is clean and steady so is forgiving on the inexperienced. IMO a smaller bike is better but the 900 is not too far out of the field. Where I live the 900 is not allowed for a learner but slightly smaller bikes such as vstar 650 is.

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post #9 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-15-2012, 06:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc8427 View Post
You should take the course first, but you don't have to. I bought my first bike, rode it for a bit and then took the course. I've been ridding for 20 years now, and I can tell you the Basic and Advanced MSF courses are an excellent way to be a better rider, and to be safer in general.

After you get good, look around for a course similar to the Jerry "MotorMan" Palladino Ride like a Pro class: https://www.ridelikeapro.com/rider-classes.

This class is all about slow speed control and maneuvers, and I highly recommend it to anyone. I had the opportunity to take it, and it is a simplified version of the police motorcycle course. Very helpful, and if you pass it you will be light years ahead of most other riders.

Doc
I agree, the course first.
It may be a life-saver

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post #10 of 37 (permalink) Old 10-15-2012, 07:15 AM
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I rode dirt bikes as a teenager more than twenty years ago.

My first street bike was the 900. I took the course first and bought the bike after getting my endorsement.

I am not a big guy, so don't take this the wrong way.
The size and strength of the rider is probably the only critical aspect of deciding if the 900 is a good bike for a new rider.
For most people, it will not be a problem.

If you have trouble getting a bike off of the stand or don't feel confident controlling the weight of the bike when stopping; then you will have a hard time focusing on learning.

Scott

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