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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-26-2015, 03:16 PM Thread Starter
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Riding with a passenger

I am now comfortable enough with my bike riding by myself, but I want to get my wife at least riding around our subdivision to see how she likes it. If she isn't comfortable after our neighborhood, I won't push it. She is five weeks pregnant and we lost our last one, I don't want to have an incident and lose this one while out on the street. Any advice other then if I lean, she leans? Also, good thoughts and prayers on the pregnancy would be appreciated. I don't want to go through losing another one. Yesterday, we got a jacket and helmet for her from a friend (75 a piece for a modular HJC helmet and a first gear jacket).
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-26-2015, 03:34 PM
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I'd rather my passenger sit still and do nothing. Sometimes they lean to much and that causes problems.
Stay off the bumpy roads-they hate that.
Use your engine braking when pulling up to a stop=cruise-coast to a stop

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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-26-2015, 03:39 PM
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she needs to do nothing, as in lean. If she needs to shift, best do it while you are moving, you will not feel it. if she shifts/moves around while you stop, she needs to warn you first, so you can support her weight transfer. other than that, you will need to brake a tad early.. Pretty simple and easy

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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-26-2015, 03:50 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, I was told that she should lean. We won't be going far at first and I won't go far at all if she isn't comfortable being on a bike while expecting. Next year, pending we are not expecting again, all bets are off.
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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-26-2015, 04:14 PM
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Always good thoughts and prayers on the pregnancy! Wish you the best there! As for riding 2-Up...lean when bike leans is the one that always gets mentioned. But other things to consider are:
1. slow speed maneuvers - parking lots, stop-and-go traffic jams, etc, coming to a stop sign or stopping at traffic light - it's important that she doesn't move around and keeps centered over bike. She doesn't need to be tense-board-stiff passenger at these; A relaxed position is fine. But you will feel every move made by a passenger at these slow speeds. And it can be a surprise when you are not expecting it to feel the bike move from her movement.
2. faster speeds - this is where she can readjust her feet or readjust her butt position if needed. Just NOT in a curve! straight clear portions of road only
3. work out a hand signal routine. signals for things like she needs to stop for a break, she sees something that she thinks you should be aware of (car pulling out of driveway up ahead or she spots a deer for example), she needs you to slow down, and as mentioned above, to alert you when she is going to readjust her position. Same goes from you to her - like when you see a bumpy patch of road ahead, let her know. Takes the surprise element out of the equation when she may get a fraction of an inch of air between her and the seat
4. go over the different pieces of the bike - front/rear brake, clutch, instruments on dash (if you have one), etc. Let her know, for example, that when slowing down you may downshift, and why. anything that can help keep surprises at bay will go a long way in the enjoyment of her ride and yours
5. take some easy riding routes in the beginning. Scenery always helps. Stay out of heavy traffic routes until both of you feel comfortable
6. tell her to breathe! especially when you take her past a batch of wild flowers

others on the forum will have more to add. These are the basics that I go over with my passengers.

I bring up tip #1 as my girlfriend and I started seeing each other last year, and she was all too excited to ride on my bike. She told me that she had ridden "many times before" so I took her at her word, and went over just the hand signals that I use. But found out quickly that she thought she had to be perfectly still and couldn't move at highway speeds, and thought she had all freedom of movement at slower speeds. So I took her to a parking lot and we practiced slow maneuvering before going out the 2nd time. I let her feel what happens when she would make an unexpected movement, like stretching her legs a bit, and she could feel the sideways movement as a result. At highway speeds, she would do the same thing and the bike wouldn't move an inch.

My oldest daughter on the other hand has basically grown up riding with me and I never feel her on the back at all. She just molds into the back and enjoys the ride. We have great times together. our hand signals are an automatic third language for her. She speaks English, Spanish and Bike!

take it slow and ramp up to longer rides as the comfort level increases, and enjoy!!

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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-26-2015, 04:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MVA-Voyager View Post
Always good thoughts and prayers on the pregnancy! Wish you the best there! As for riding 2-Up...lean when bike leans is the one that always gets mentioned. But other things to consider are:
1. slow speed maneuvers - parking lots, stop-and-go traffic jams, etc, coming to a stop sign or stopping at traffic light - it's important that she doesn't move around and keeps centered over bike. She doesn't need to be tense-board-stiff passenger at these; A relaxed position is fine. But you will feel every move made by a passenger at these slow speeds. And it can be a surprise when you are not expecting it to feel the bike move from her movement.
2. faster speeds - this is where she can readjust her feet or readjust her butt position if needed. Just NOT in a curve! straight clear portions of road only
3. work out a hand signal routine. signals for things like she needs to stop for a break, she sees something that she thinks you should be aware of (car pulling out of driveway up ahead or she spots a deer for example), she needs you to slow down, and as mentioned above, to alert you when she is going to readjust her position. Same goes from you to her - like when you see a bumpy patch of road ahead, let her know. Takes the surprise element out of the equation when she may get a fraction of an inch of air between her and the seat
4. go over the different pieces of the bike - front/rear brake, clutch, instruments on dash (if you have one), etc. Let her know, for example, that when slowing down you may downshift, and why. anything that can help keep surprises at bay will go a long way in the enjoyment of her ride and yours
5. take some easy riding routes in the beginning. Scenery always helps. Stay out of heavy traffic routes until both of you feel comfortable
6. tell her to breathe! especially when you take her past a batch of wild flowers

others on the forum will have more to add. These are the basics that I go over with my passengers.

I bring up tip #1 as my girlfriend and I started seeing each other last year, and she was all too excited to ride on my bike. She told me that she had ridden "many times before" so I took her at her word, and went over just the hand signals that I use. But found out quickly that she thought she had to be perfectly still and couldn't move at highway speeds, and thought she had all freedom of movement at slower speeds. So I took her to a parking lot and we practiced slow maneuvering before going out the 2nd time. I let her feel what happens when she would make an unexpected movement, like stretching her legs a bit, and she could feel the sideways movement as a result. At highway speeds, she would do the same thing and the bike wouldn't move an inch.

My oldest daughter on the other hand has basically grown up riding with me and I never feel her on the back at all. She just molds into the back and enjoys the ride. We have great times together. our hand signals are an automatic third language for her. She speaks English, Spanish and Bike!

take it slow and ramp up to longer rides as the comfort level increases, and enjoy!!
Great tips!

"Steve"
2011 Vaquero
2008 900 Custom(Sold)
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AUX DRIVING LIGHT,BATTISTINI GRIPS AND PASS PEGS,THUNDER RAPTOR FLOORBOARDS,
STITCH ON TIME CUSTOM TEMPERPEDIC SADDLE
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-27-2015, 10:17 AM
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Other than what has been mentioned - the passenger should look over your inside shoulder when going through a curve. ie If you're turning left, have them look over your left shoulder. That should pretty much get them leaning as much as needed.

Joel

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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-27-2015, 10:33 AM
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I told my wife (GF) at the time to do one of 2 things, scoot up and hold on to me tight so you move with me, or scoot back all the way against the sissy bar and move with it. No more or no less. That way she because part of the bike and gets comfortable with it. I think the confusing part is the line of thinking. Some think you lean and the bike leans which implies effort on your part, well move with the bike when you counter steer.

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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-27-2015, 11:36 AM
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SWVA is right on the money, when I started to ride 2up, my wife was tense at first, I believe if say it like "you should lean" they think they have to learn how to, I would rather tell her to just allow herself to relax, enjoy the ride and lean WITH YOU as you maneuver. For a passenger new to riding the backrest does wonders for their confidence level and enjoyment of the ride.
Also find a way to keep comunication with her during the ride, they are use to some conversation during a car ride, gradually she'll get that sitting there making you look like a stud is enough, my wife now gets on the bike, puts on headphones and I wont hear a peep from her for a lot of miles, she has come to really enjoy the rides.


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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-27-2015, 05:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chanoc1077 View Post
SWVA is right on the money, when I started to ride 2up, my wife was tense at first, I believe if say it like "you should lean" they think they have to learn how to, I would rather tell her to just allow herself to relax, enjoy the ride and lean WITH YOU as you maneuver. For a passenger new to riding the backrest does wonders for their confidence level and enjoyment of the ride.
Also find a way to keep comunication with her during the ride, they are use to some conversation during a car ride, gradually she'll get that sitting there making you look like a stud is enough, my wife now gets on the bike, puts on headphones and I wont hear a peep from her for a lot of miles, she has come to really enjoy the rides.
All members need those headphones. LOL.
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