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Old 11-11-2012, 11:07 PM   #11
Romans5.8
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One of the things in that book that really jumped out at me was the riders with LESS than six months experience were SIGNIFICANTLY less dangerous with riders with more than six months, but less than (I think) two years experience. Basically, don't get overconfident. Learn new things, push yourself a little, improve your skills. BUT, don't push yourself into dangerous situations, and keep that head on a swivel! I firmly believe that the reason for that statistic is that 6-24 month riders are confident in their abilities, and thus are no longer looking for extra stopping distance and watching side streets like a hawk (when they were less confident in their braking and such). Remember your very first time on a public road? BUT, those riders have not yet had a 'pucker' moment to remind them that, even though they've started to hone their skills, they STILL have to keep their head on a swivel! Better to slow down and yield to a driver who you can tell isn't going to stop (because you were looking for such a thing), than to have to practice your maximum-effort stop with a couple tons of steel stuck in the road in front of you!

And Scott, I gotcha beat! I too have been riding for a year, but I put 15,000 on my bike this year

Quote:
Originally Posted by SWVA_08V2k View Post
That is probably a good idea, got to know how to handle it by your self before you add another on it. Also if they are interested in riding with you (I have my wife the same speech) tell them to sit against the sissy bar and move with it. I am driving this bike and I do not need your help in doing so, so do lean for or against me. Keep your feet on the peg and your butt still. If you need to move ya butt or feet let me know first and I will tell you when it is ok. After a while you will be in tune with each other and it will become easier. Just don't make the passenger uneasy or tense you will be able to tell in the handling of the bike.

I take my 4 year old up the road and back but its just literally up a 1 lane dead end county back road and I am the next to last house on it.
+1. I AM a newbie (though I have more miles than some 10 year veterans I've known!), but I still firmly believe that if you cannot control the bike unless your passenger leans a certain way, or you won't be able to negotiate a curve if a passenger goofs and leans their body or shifts in their seat, then you do not have enough control of the bike to handle a passenger yet. I give the same speech to my passengers, but in the event that they screw up, it's still MY machine to control, and because I've practiced counter-steering techniques and I lean the bike with the bars, not manhandle it with my weight, I can easily overcome the weight of a mis-placed passenger. Once my wife was on the back and we went around a corner, and for some reason her foot slipped on the peg and she got scared and 'instinctively' leaned the opposite direction. I wasn't happy about that and told her so, but I was able to press harder on the bars and keep the bike going where I needed it to. The fact is, passengers can, will, and do make mistakes. If you are relying on them for your safety, and if you have to have them do something in order to remain in control of the bike (yes, I recognize certain things make it safer and easier, but they do screw up sometimes!) then you aren't in control enough for a passenger yet!
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Last edited by Romans5.8; 11-11-2012 at 11:12 PM.
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Old 11-12-2012, 05:45 AM   #12
SWVA_08V2k
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Romans5.8 View Post
One of the things in that book that really jumped out at me was the riders with LESS than six months experience were SIGNIFICANTLY less dangerous with riders with more than six months, but less than (I think) two years experience. Basically, don't get overconfident. Learn new things, push yourself a little, improve your skills. BUT, don't push yourself into dangerous situations, and keep that head on a swivel! I firmly believe that the reason for that statistic is that 6-24 month riders are confident in their abilities, and thus are no longer looking for extra stopping distance and watching side streets like a hawk (when they were less confident in their braking and such). Remember your very first time on a public road? BUT, those riders have not yet had a 'pucker' moment to remind them that, even though they've started to hone their skills, they STILL have to keep their head on a swivel! Better to slow down and yield to a driver who you can tell isn't going to stop (because you were looking for such a thing), than to have to practice your maximum-effort stop with a couple tons of steel stuck in the road in front of you!

And Scott, I gotcha beat! I too have been riding for a year, but I put 15,000 on my bike this year



+1. I AM a newbie (though I have more miles than some 10 year veterans I've known!), but I still firmly believe that if you cannot control the bike unless your passenger leans a certain way, or you won't be able to negotiate a curve if a passenger goofs and leans their body or shifts in their seat, then you do not have enough control of the bike to handle a passenger yet. I give the same speech to my passengers, but in the event that they screw up, it's still MY machine to control, and because I've practiced counter-steering techniques and I lean the bike with the bars, not manhandle it with my weight, I can easily overcome the weight of a mis-placed passenger. Once my wife was on the back and we went around a corner, and for some reason her foot slipped on the peg and she got scared and 'instinctively' leaned the opposite direction. I wasn't happy about that and told her so, but I was able to press harder on the bars and keep the bike going where I needed it to. The fact is, passengers can, will, and do make mistakes. If you are relying on them for your safety, and if you have to have them do something in order to remain in control of the bike (yes, I recognize certain things make it safer and easier, but they do screw up sometimes!) then you aren't in control enough for a passenger yet!
I agree 100%. But when first starting out with a passenger they need to stay on top of their game too so you can learn to handle the bike with the added weight. I remember the first time my wife had a little slip up. It almost took us down. We was pulling up to an intersection (2 land side road on to a 4 lane road) that had a lot of pea gravel. Well she saw some one she knew and turned around to look and wave as I was putting my feet down. Lucky enough it was there because after some "scoobie-doo" style foot work I kept control of the bike and told her not to do that again. But like you said this is your ship and you are the commander of said ship. It all comes in due time. I never had a problem with counter-steering I was doing it riding before I knew what it was.
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:44 AM   #13
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One important safety tool of motoring that I have utilized for the past 15 plus years is the Smith System. And, knock on wood, I have accumulated 1.5 Million miles plus of safe accident free driving, while carrying some of the most dangerous Hazard Class Materials known. From the Black Hills of Montana, to Alligator Alley of Florida. From Bangor to San Diego... and any/everywhere in between. Whether its highways byways, backwoods or thru the woods, my driving habits remain the same...

1... aim high in steering) don't just look at whats immediately ahead of you, look at whats ahead of Them, as far as you can. if you wait until your front door reacts, you're too late.
2... get the big picture) having an accident and hoping you survive to tell the cops it isn't your fault is not good enough. Be aware of everything going on around you. Front back and side to side. The sooner you become aware of hazards, the more time you have to react. Always be aware of whats ahead, beside, and behind you at all times.
3...) Keep your eyes moving) kinda speaks for itself. Continually scan the road as well as the side walks and side roads. Will that car turn out of that side road? Will that kid walking his dog run out in your path? Will those road rage vehicles collide and end up in your path? If your eyes are always scanning, it greatly reduces your chance of being surprised by a situation.
4... leave yourself an out) you never want to be the guy who rear ends a soccer mom and her mini van full of kids, nor do you want to be the guy rear ended by the Mack truck. The more aware you are, the less likely you are to get yourself in situations where you have Nowhere to Go.

Its not foolproof, but it does work if you work it... but you gotta work it. But I have to warn you, once you start using it, once it becomes a part of your mental like second nature, you will catch yourself taking your time and enjoying the ride more no matter what you drive
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Old 11-12-2012, 07:32 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kinnally View Post
Wow Scott, 13000 in one year? That's logging a few miles. Riding is one of the best ways to get better. I would suggest to anyone looking to get better is to take a MSF foundation course.
I know this is kinda redundant on a motorcycle forum; but I like to ride.

I think riding in winter is what allowed me to put a few extra miles on.
When it got cold I wasn't ready to put her up. So, I bought some gear and kept riding; even when I was the only two wheeler on the street.
Mild winters in N. TX helps.

Hey John,
I get more miles than most people I know; but I don't expect to even place around here.
Is Big Toe the user name for the guy with 150k plus on a 900?

Scott
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Old 12-19-2012, 08:18 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott_in_TX View Post
I know this is kinda redundant on a motorcycle forum; but I like to ride.

I think riding in winter is what allowed me to put a few extra miles on.
When it got cold I wasn't ready to put her up. So, I bought some gear and kept riding; even when I was the only two wheeler on the street.
Mild winters in N. TX helps.


Scott
Same here Just bought my 900 I could not put her away, I just added some cold weather gear, Got to love TX for Mild weather.

Just got back in the saddle again and what kicks my butt every time is being over confident. The list here is a good list, Aways try to know what the other guy going to do helps a lot

Drive Safe!
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Old 12-19-2012, 08:55 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ErnieC View Post
Same here Just bought my 900 I could not put her away, I just added some cold weather gear, Got to love TX for Mild weather.

Just got back in the saddle again and what kicks my butt every time is being over confident. The list here is a good list, Aways try to know what the other guy going to do helps a lot

Drive Safe!
It has been extra mild this year.

The two pieces of equipment that made the most difference on my 900 for cold weather riding were:

Hand wind deflectors. (kind of ugly, but with some cheap winter gloves I got about 30 minutes at 70 mph in 35F temps before my fingers hurt)
http://www.jpcycles.com/product/ZZ75585

Half chaps (less than a minute to put on less than 15 seconds to take off)
http://bikerbabesleathers.com/Leathe...ngs_p_192.html

I liked my Kawasaki lowers too; but they were a distant 3rd for cold weather gear.

Scott
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Avon grips with Rays Throttle Mod
Thunder BAK for stock covers
Power Commander V
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Wrapped headers
Corbin Dual Touring (w/Comfort foam)
Wolo Bad Boy
Glove compartment keyless mod
Can-am antennae
Ipod connector
Saddlebag side and top trim


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